Healthcare Devices for Maternity: Nausea relief bracelets are drug free solution to your motion sickness

As they are drug and chemical free, nausea relief bracelets are one of the best products in our healthcare devices for maternity women series.

Even if you don’t leave your couch, the first trimester can be a wild ride of nausea and motion sickness.

I wore these sea bands every night before bed, and they helped me sleep soundly (yes, nighttime sickness exists!). The bracelets use pressure points to relieve nausea rather than drugs or chemicals. They’re also machine washable and come with a handy travel case.

 

Wristbands

What Wristbands are: Wristbands provide relief by applying pressure to specific points along meridians on the body to keep energy flowing evenly. A band applies constant pressure to your P6 point, which is located on your inner arm just below your wrist; this stimulates the median nerve, interfering with “I’m sick” messages sent between the brain and the stomach.

What we know: According to a 2018 study published in the journal Cancer, these types of bands did not significantly reduce nausea in paediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, previous research found that they reduced migraine-induced nausea as well as the severity and frequency of nausea in pregnant women.

Should you try it? Yes, the bands are secure and inexpensive. According to Dr. Szarka, stimulating the P6 point can be as effective as anti-nausea medications for some patients suffering from motion sickness or anesthesia.

Brands to check out: Sea-Bands are washable elastic bands. Psi Bands are plastic bands that comes with adjustable pressure. Both can be purchased in stores or online ($10 to $15).

Acustimulation Bracelets

What acustimulaion Bracelets are: Battery-powered wristbands which use electrical pulses to stimulate the median nerve, disrupting nausea signals (before slipping one on, apply a conductivity gel to your wrist’s P6 point). You can change the strength of your pulse depending on how sick you are.

What we know: Acustimulation appears to be promising, but research is limited. One small study published in the journal Military Medicine discovered that it reduced nausea in test subjects during a driving simulation. A review of 29 studies found conflicting results regarding its ability to alleviate pregnancy-related nausea.

Should you try it? It’s an appealing option because it’s free of drugs and side effects. “There is little medical risk, and some people find the bracelets useful,” says David Odell, M.D., assistant professor of thoracic surgery at Northwestern Medicine. However, they are not inexpensive.

Brands to check out: Reliefband ($100 to $175, plus the cost of its gel refills).

What Neck Brace is: A battery-powered wrap that looks like a travel pillow and is marketed to treat nausea caused by “sensory mismatch”—when your eyes and inner ear detect movement while you’re still. Electrical pulses and frequencies are delivered to the inner ear, as well as the median and vagus nerves in the back of the neck, to disrupt nausea signals between the brain and the gastric system.

What we know: There’s no such conclusion on whether targeting these mentioned areas alleviates nausea from motion sickness.

Should you try it? It is meant only for nausea which caused by motion sickness, so it probably won’t help with affected nausea due to other causes. It does, however, come with a money-back guarantee service.

Brands to check out: MotionCure has cornered the healthcare market on this one (about $150 online).

Can a Wristband Really Get Rid of Nausea and Motion Sickness?

Everyone gets sick now and then. Travel, pregnancy hormones, and chemotherapy are all common triggers. However, nausea can be difficult to treat because what works for one person may not work for another, according to Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist Lawrence Szarka, M.D.

Complicating matters is the fact that the placebo effect is frequent with nausea—people often feel better simply since they believe a treatment is working, rather than because there is a reliable mechanism involved.

There are a dozen or so anti-nausea wearables on the market for those who want to avoid over-the-counter medications like Dramamine.

(Disclaimer: The content in this blog is been fetched from the known sites like healthline to spread awareness and knowledge for our visitors, it has no rights reserved to GFI)

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